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Wednesday, June 12, 2019

National Loving Day

Loving Day's mission is to fight racial prejudice through education and to build multicultural community.

Summary

It's a global network of annual celebrations you can host or attend.
It's also an educational campaign that you can be a part of every day.

Goals:

  • Create a common connection between multicultural communities, groups and individuals
  • Build multicultural awareness, understanding, acceptance, and identity
  • Educate the public about the history of interracial relationships in order to fight prejudice
  • Establish a tradition of Loving Day celebrations as a means to achieve these goals

Loving Day Celebrations

A global network of Loving Day celebrations commemorate the anniversary of the Loving decision every year on or around June 12th. We host the Loving Day Flagship Celebration in New York City. We coordinate with multiethnic community groups to promote their Loving Day Celebrations all over the United States. We also encourage people to host their own celebrations for friends and family. These celebrations are diverse in terms of both content and location, but we tie them together though our event listings on LovingDay.org. Loving Day Celebrations are shared among friends and passed down through families to establish a new multicultural tradition. Share using the #lovingday hashtag, which has trended at #3 on Twitter in the U.S.

Education

Like the Martin Luther King Jr. holiday, Loving Day provides an annual opportunity for people to learn history's lessons while envisioning ways to improve the future. However, Loving Day is not limited to a single annual event. It's also an educational campaign that you can be a part of every day. We provide free and accessible educational resources all year long, many of which are available through the Loving Day website. We believe that education is a necessary part of promoting tolerance, awareness, and understanding.

The Name

The Loving Day name comes from Loving v. Virginia (1967), the landmark Supreme Court decision that declared all laws against interracial marriage unconstitutional in the United States. We found it quite perfect that a couple named Richard and Mildred Loving won their right to marry, and we know a good thing when we see it. So, Loving Day refers to two kinds of loving: the couple in the Supreme Court case, and the original definition of loving.

Our History

Loving Day began as a graduate thesis project at Parsons School of Design in New York City. It was created by Ken Tanabe, a graphic designer, who accidentally discovered the Loving case while Googling something else. Being of interracial, intercultural, and international heritage himself, he was shocked that no one ever taught him about the case. He was also shocked to learn that no one else his age seemed to know about it either. That's how it all started.
The Loving Day website went live in June of 2004. Since then, Loving Day has expanded into a global network of celebrations. Loving Day has been featured in major national and international press, including the Washington Post, NPR, ABC, and BBC World.

Our Structure

The Loving Day project (including this website) is organized and maintained by a dedicated group of volunteers. We work hard every day to encourage celebrations, plan events, provide resources, and make Loving Day a new tradition. Our core team meets in New York City, but we collaborate with volunteers all over the globe. Please consider volunteering your time or expertise, or making an in-kind or tax deductible financial contribution.

Supporters

The Loving Day idea has been embraced globally by a diverse range of individuals and organizations. Loving Day is especially popular among interracial, multicultural, international, and interfaith couples - as well as multiracial and multicultural people. However, we believe that anyone who believes in fighting prejudice and building multicultural community can be a part of Loving Day. You didn't have to be of a particular race to march with Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., and you (or your significant other) don't have to be of a particular race to celebrate Loving Day.

Source: lovingday.org

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